BBS Priorities and unable to boot into Windows 10

thecyclegeek

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Joined
Jul 28, 2017
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2
I had a problem come up yesterday evening where my PC (specs below) completely froze (except for moving the mouse around the screen - couldn't do anything else) and I had to do a hard reboot. After that reboot my PC would immediately go to the BIOS and wouldn't start Windows. There were no error messages displayed on screen that I could see. I managed to fix the problem, but I don't fully understand why that option worked, so I'm seeking some input from here.

I went through the following steps:
1. I rebooted multiple times, removed all peripherals and other drives, disabled fast boot, and made sure that my SSD with Windows 10 was selected at the top of the UEFI boot order. All good but problem persists and the PC goes directly to the MSI BIOS after attempting to boot into Windows.
2. All SATA drives that are plugged in are showing in the list of devices, including my main SSD. I shutdown, reseated the memory, ensured all SATA cables were secured, etc. Again, I rebooted but same issue.
3. I suspected an issue with my SSD, so (just to be sure) I removed it and attached it via an external dock to another PC. Disk checks and data transfers off of the drive were perfect and reported no issues. Didn't appear to be a data issue. I created a bootable recovery USB for Windows 10.
4. I changed the boot order and plugged in the recovery USB. I went into the options and tried to do a repair but it failed to repair Windows. Next I checked for Windows restore points but it couldn't find any (I confirmed later that I had many different restore points so this was really weird).
5. I left my PC unplugged over night to see if the CMOS battery was dead, but the settings and time were OK when I plugged it back in this morning.
6. I booted off the USB drive and went to the command line. Listing the volumes was fine. Listing the partitions was also fine, and I could see the SYSTEM partition of 100MB. Checking advice online, I formatted that partition and then did bcdboot C:\Windows, and it reported as successful. I removed the USB and rebooted but it went back to the same MSI BIOS.
7. At this point I went back to the Settings\Boot menu in the BIOS. Boot mode select was UEFI as expected. My SSD was at the top of the FIXED BOOT ORDER Priorities. However, UEFI Hard Disk Drive BBS Priorities was set to DISABLED. I clicked on that, selected the Windows Boot Manager on my Crucial SSD, exited and it successfully booted to Windows 10 again!

I don't think I had ever selected that setting before and I had been successfully booting into Windows 10 for years before this issue. Why would selecting that option resolve the issue? Perhaps the BIOS setting got disabled/corrupted when I did the hard reboot? Any ideas?

My PC was built about 5 years ago with an MSI Z170A Gaming M5 motherboard, and these specs:
- Crucial CT480M SSD (Main SSD with Windows 10 Pro installed)
- G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600)
- Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6600K CPU @ 3.50GHz
- 4x other drives (1x SSD, 2x HDD)
 

fatedust

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Apr 9, 2020
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If Windows Boot Manager is disabled, then it makes sense that system can't get into OS.
But according to what you've said, you've never done anything but system just set it to disabled automatically...?
Might need some input from others too, cause this sounds really weird.
 

thecyclegeek

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Jul 28, 2017
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Just wondering if anyone else might have some insights as to how this setting switch could've occurred on a hard reboot. Is there anyway to test if the storage used for the BIOS firmware might be faulty?
 

citay

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Oct 12, 2016
Messages
813
You know what, my cousin had the exact same problem several times now. But here's the weird part. His mainboard is a Gigabyte GA-AB350M-DS3H.

Sometimes, the SSD (Samsung 850 Evo), or rather, Windows Boot Manager, is not the top entry in the boot order anymore. Without ever touching the BIOS.
 
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