Changing HALs on win2000/XP (ACPI/AMP/APIC)

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Assaf

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First let's explain shortly what APM/ACPI and APIC are.
I would like to explain that I am not a computer engineer so there might be slight errors in the explanation, it has no effect on the point to which I am writing this and it is only ment for general understanding.

APM - Advanced Power Management.
The basic power functions we expect from ATX boards:
Auto shut off, stand by and suspend mode.

ACPI - Advanced Configuration and Power Interface.
It is an entire interface between the operating system and system resources. With an ACPI enabled system the user has no controll over IRQ's (which is generally a good thing).
It also adds on the power featurs things like suspend to RAM.
ACPI is backwards compatible with APM.

APIC - Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller.
A more efficiant method over PIC to controll interrupt handling, originally used in multy proccessor systems it has been adopten in the PC.
APIC can be used on it's own or together with ACPI!
APIC also includes an MPS setting in the bios, set it to 1.4 if you use APIC.



What this means:
APM will have limited power saving options and is most likely to have resource conflict issues.

ACPI is the most stable but can be slower than when combined with APIC.

APIC is theoreticly the fastest, however in reality there are cases where it will cause strange behavior in a system. In such cases it is recomended to switch to simple ACPI.


/EDIT - suggestion by dewhound/
It is important the bios options for APIC and ACPI be set prior to operating system instalation.
ACPI should always be enabled, APIC is a matter of personal choice and experiance, disabling it is the safew path, enabling it could give better preformance.
/End edit/



HAL - Hardware Abstraction Layer:
Is the method the operating system communicates with the system (motherboard, CPU and peripherals via the motherboard).

Important:
The HAL you install must be supported by the bios, if it isn't you will face a no boot situation!!!


The bios settings generally are (ACPI, sometimes spelled IPCA) and APIC.
If ACPI is disabled only AMP will be supported (as it is the lowest level of compatability requiered in a modern board. Some older board have the option to even disable the APM.
Next is ACPI enabled, this allows the use of APM and/or ACPI.
Last is APIC, you must enable it befor using a HAL that supports APIC.




Changing the actual HAL:


This is done in the device manager as shown in the following photos. I have skipped trivial steps in between so just press next on them.


double click it








ACPI multiprocessor - dual (or more) CPU with ACPI APIC HAL.
ACPI uniprocessor - single CPU with ACPI APIC HAL
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC - single CPU with ACPI HAL
MPS multiprocessor - dual (or more) CPU with APIC HAL
MPS uniprocessor - single CPU with APIC HAL
Standard PC - Legacy mode, all resources can be set manually and no power management.


Do not forget to enable in the bios all the settings requiered by the HAL you are going to use.



Using windowsXP on an older board is a good reson in some cases to switch HAL since older boards have an ACPI bios that is sometimes incompatible with XP.
Changing to standard PC is a solution for crashes caused by this situation.

The downside is the loss of power functions.
Some power functions can be restored by installing the "NT/APM legacy support" from the add/remove hardware section in the control panel.

Here is how:















If you have any suggestion to add to this feel free to send me a private message.

 

Wonkanoby

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http://www.jsiinc.com/SUBN/tip6500/rh6514.htm

6514 ? How do I shutdown without receiving 'It is now safe to turn off your computer'?



NOTE: The text in the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article is provided so that the site search can find this page. Please click the Knowledge Base link to insure that you are reading the most current information.

Microsoft Knowledge Base article Q810903 contains:


SYMPTOMS
When you try to shut down your Windows XP-based or Windows 2000-based computer, the computer may stop responding ("hang"), and you may receive the following message:

It is now safe to turn off your computer
CAUSE
This behavior may occur if any of the following conditions are true:
Your computer supports the Advanced Power Management (APM) feature, but the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACP)-compliant basic input/output system (BIOS) is not configured correctly to allow the operating system to turn off the power supply.
During an upgrade of the operating system, Windows does not detect that the computer is ACPI-compliant.
An OEM device driver or service is installed on your computer that is preventing the computer from correctly shutting down.
Your computer is not ACPI-compliant.
RESOLUTION
To resolve this issue, follow these steps:
Step 1: Enable Advanced Power Management Support
Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.

Note If you are using Windows XP, click Switch to Classic View in Control Panel to more easily follow these steps.
Click the APM tab.

Note If you are using multiple monitors, the APM tab may not be available.
Select Enable Advanced Power Management Support, and then click OK.
Step 2: Confirm That the Computer's CMOS/BIOS Settings Are Correct.
Warning This procedure may involve changing your computer's complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) settings and altering the BIOS. Incorrect changes to the BIOS of your computer may cause serious problems. Change the computer's CMOS settings at your own risk.

Incorrect or damaged CMOS and BIOS settings can cause startup and shutdown problems. For information about the correct CMOS and BIOS settings for your computer and how to check and change these settings, see the documentation that came with your computer or contact the manufacturer. To confirm that the computer's BIOS is current, contact the computer manufacturer to inquire about the latest BIOS update that is available for your computer.
Step 3: Verify That the Computer Is ACPI-Compliant
Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click System.
Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
Expand the Computer branch. A specification similar to one of the following will appear:
ACPI Multiprocessor PC
ACPI Uniprocessor PC
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC
Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible
MPS Uniprocessor PC
MPS Multiprocessor PC
Standard PC
If your computer is listed as Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC, go to "Step 4: If the Computer Is ACPI-Compliant."

If your computer is listed as a Standard PC, the issue will occur. However, you may be able to work around this issue. Go to "Step 5: If the Computer Is Not ACPI Compliant."

If your computer is listed as a Standard PC, but you are sure that the computer is ACPI-compliant, go to "Step 4: If the Computer Is ACPI Compliant."
Step 4: If the Computer Is ACPI-Compliant
If your computer is ACPI-compliant, follow these steps:
Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add or Remove Programs.
See if any of the following programs is installed:
Logitech mouse drivers
Adaptec/Roxio software
Zone Alarm
If any of these programs is installed, either contact the manufacturer of the program for an updated version or temporarily remove the program.
Try to shut down the computer to see if the issue is resolved.
If the issue still occurs, use Task Manager to determine the programs that are currently running on the computer. Manually quit each program that is listed in Task Manager, and then shut down and restart the computer to test if the shutdown problem is resolved. To do this, follow these steps:

Note All programs that are currently running on the computer may not be listed in the Applications tab of Task Manager.
Press CTRL+ALT+DELETE, and then click Task Manager.
Click the Applications tab.
In the Task column, click the program that you want to quit, and then click End Task.
Quit Task Manager.
Shut down the computer.
If the issue still occurs, contact the manufacturers of any additional devices on your computer (such as video adapters or sound cards) to obtain the latest drivers for the devices. For information about how to contact the hardware manufacturer, click the appropriate article number in the following list to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
65416 Hardware and Software Third-Party Vendor Contact List, A-K

60781 Hardware and Software Third-Party Vendor Contact List, L-P

60782 Hardware and Software Third-Party Vendor Contact List, Q-Z

If the issue still occurs after you install current drivers, you may be able to work around this issue by converting the computer to be ACPI-compliant by changing the driver for the item under the Computer branch.

Important This procedure contains information about changing the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) driver. Before you continue, make sure that the computer is ACPI-compliant, and make sure that you know how to restore Windows if a problem occurs. For additional information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
237556 How to Troubleshoot Windows 2000 Hardware Abstraction Layer Issues

Warning Modifying the HAL incorrectly can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Do not try to change from a standard HAL to an ACPI HAL unless you are sure that the computer is ACPI-compliant (for example, if you know that the ACPI HAL was supported before you upgraded your operating system, or if you can confirm that the computer supports ACPI by inspecting the BIOS). Incorrectly modifying the HAL can result in your computer not starting. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems resulting from incorrectly changing the HAL can be solved. Change the HAL at your own risk.

If you are sure that your computer is ACPI-compliant, follow these steps:
In Control Panel, double-click System.
Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
Expand the Computer branch, and then double-click the detected HAL (for example Standard PC).
Click the Driver tab, and then click Update Drivers.

Note You can only change or update your HAL from Device Manager under Computer Type when you change from a Standard PC HAL to a Standard Multiprocessor PC HAL, because changing from an ACPI HAL to a Standard HAL can result in not being able to start your computer.
Step 5: If the Computer Is Not ACPI-Compliant
If the computer is not ACPI-compliant, you may be able to work around this issue by installing the NT APM/Legacy Device. Before you install the NT APM/Legacy device, you must first disable the Microsoft ACPI Device if it is installed.

To disable the Microsoft ACPI Device:
Open the Control Panel, and then double-click System.
Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
On the View menu, click Show Hidden Devices.
Expand Non-Plug and Play Drivers.
Do either of the following:
If Microsoft ACPI Driver is not listed:

In the NT APM/Legacy Support branch of the device tree, you should see the item NT Apm/Legacy Interface Node. It should show a red X to indicate that it is disabled.

Right-click NT Apm/Legacy Interface Node, and then click Enable.

After you perform these steps, Windows should shut down properly.
If Microsoft ACPI Driver is listed, follow these steps:
Double-click Microsoft ACPI Driver.
Click the Driver tab, and then in the Type box, click Disabled.
Click OK, and then restart the computer.
When Windows restarts, repeat these steps to open the Microsoft ACPI Driver Properties dialog box, and then click the Driver tab.

Verify the following:
Disabled appears in the Type box.
Stopped appears in the Status section.
After you verify that the Microsoft ACPI Device is disabled, continue with the following steps to install the NT APM/Legacy device:
Open Control Panel, and then double-click Add Hardware.
When the Hardware Wizard completes searching for new hardware, click Yes, I have already connected the hardware, and then click Next.
Scroll to the bottom of the Installed Hardware list, click Add a new hardware device, and then click Next.
Click Install the hardware that I manually select from a list (Advanced), and then click Next.
Under Common Hardware Types, click NT Apm/Legacy Support, and then click Next.
Click NT Apm/Legacy Interface Node, and then click Next.
Click Next again, and then click Finish.
The computer should now correctly shut down. The third-party products that are discussed in this article are manufactured by companies that are independent of Microsoft. Microsoft makes no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding the performance or reliability of these products. Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.
 
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