Display problem with MSI GE62 6QD

veeras.44

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I absolutely love the MSI brand of laptops and Ordered a MSI GE62 6QD 45 days before.
The laptop was all okay for the first day and from the second day it has a Display Bleed. Most of the forum and googling pointed out to the fact that these are common on IPS panel. I loving having a dark background and the Bleed was very much annoying to me. People gave me different names like Mura effect or Display Bleed and in my world, I would way it is not acceptable nor i can live with it ! For these laptops doesn't come by cheap
I returned it back (with 14 days return/defect policy). They accepted it to be a faulty one and provided a brand new replacement one. To my misfortune, the second one had Display Bleed right from the second I turned it on (BRAND NEW). I again returned it back and again they told it was a faulty one and ask me the same question. Replacement or Refund :(
I really have no intentions to choose another brand as I am very addicted to MSI already. The closest one which I liked was a Ideadpad 700 but that would be a compromise if I opt for it

1) Probably to all MSI users. Is all of the MSI GE62 laptop have this problem and we just choose to live with it ?
2) Are there any recommended buyers from where I can Order a new one. Just to avoid the same retailer just incase the problem was with them
3) I am okay to pay more as well. is there a better model than GE62 which does not have the display problem.
GE62 capacity was more than enough for me but if getting a better model solves the problem.. I will opt for it..  I dont want to choose something other than MSI :(

PLEASE HELP
 

davidh

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veeras.44 date=1466077666 said:
...1) Probably to all MSI users. Is all of the MSI GE62 laptop have this problem and we just choose to live with it ? ...
Hi veeras.44,

In most cases the problem is not the display. Rather it is poor education from MSI and user error. Here's the situation...

First, IPS panels bleed more than TN and VA panels. There is no way around this fact until IPS technology improves. My GT80 has a PLS (Samsung's IPS-like technology) and it seems to be better than IPS, too. As with all of the LCD technologies, each has its strengths and weaknesses. This is the weakness of IPS. Another weakness is that IPS are much slower than TN so you'll see more ghosting in fast action scenes (don't believe the IPS specs regarding speed---many manufactures use fudged numbers that do not reflect reality). If you want inky dark blacks, VA panels are the absolute best LCD---but they are not available in notebooks as far as I'm aware. I use a 40-inch Philips Brilliance BDM4065UC with a 4K UHD VA panel as my primary external monitor and it has great blacks.

Second, most MSI notebooks now come with super bright backlights. The ability to have a very bright backlight is great if you are using your notebook in a brightly lit room or near windows with sunshine streaming in. But if you plan to use your MSI notebook in a darkened environment, you need to turn the backlight brightness way, way, way down! I think I had to turn the brightness setting on my GT80 down to 35% in order to properly calibrate it for photo editing.

It's the combination of an IPS panel with a too-bright backlight that makes the problem so bad. MSI needs to educate users that the brightness must to be turned way down for dark environments.

When comparing IPS panels of one notebook versus another, you must be careful to insure that the comparison is fair. There are many ways to hide backlight bleed by the choice of image you view and the ambient brightness of the environment. And remember, the absolute backlight brightness may vary significantly from manufacturer to another. In other words, a 100% brightness setting may be much brighter on one notebook than another. The IPS panels on both notebooks may bleed the same but the brighter backlight on one will draw attention to the problem more than the dimmer backlight on the other. The only accurate way to compare the displays of different notebooks is to calibrate them to an industry standard so their brightness is the same and their color is as accurate as possible. Then view them under identical room lighting conditions using the same images and video samples. Some good reviewers will do this.

Kind regards, David
 

veeras.44

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Hi David,

Thanks a lot for your brilliant and detailed  response. Let me try playing around with my Brightness settings to see if my new replacement laptop does the wonder for me.
Will the UHD Screen do any better for me to escape the problem i.e. turning on the brightness as per my room ambience might be tedious on a longer  run. I equally play and watch movies (which would be on a darker environment)
This would be my third MSI laptop and was accepted as a product Defect when I returned it twice. It was something that I was never able to control and a patch of light was visible on all corners of the laptop even before I was prompted for the default Windows setup screen.

Regards, Veera
 

davidh

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veeras.44 date=1466089297 said:
... Will the UHD Screen do any better for me to escape the problem i.e. turning on the brightness as per my room ambience might be tedious on a longer  run. I equally play and watch movies (which would be on a darker environment) ...
Hi Veera,

UHD
Regarding a UHD display (3840 x 2160 pixels) in a notebook, I think it is a bad idea. Such a high resolution crammed into a 17.3 or 15.4 inch display is too much. Each pixel is too small to clearly see. Yet Windows and many applications depend on you being able to see individual pixels and many will not scale appropriately to work with such high pixel densities.

With a notebook-size UHD you're forced to make huge ugly compromises. Either you avoid scaling Windows too much and suffer with menus, buttons, controls and text being much too small to comfortably see. Or, you push the scale factor too high and many user interfaces break because they were never designed to be used like this.

Unless the only thing you plan to do with your notebook is look at pretty photos and videos with minimal interaction with program user interfaces, such high pixel densities are a very bad idea---for the present. One day in the future, a better version of Windows and most applications may be designed to handle small super-high-resolution displays. But until that day comes, stick with FHD (1920 x 1080 pixels) for a built-in notebook display.

As for your question about UHD displays having less bleeding, I don't know. You'd need to get your hands (and eyes) on one and play with it in a dark room to know. (I wouldn't use a UHD display any smaller than 40 inches.)

But I think you're missing something from our earlier conversation. Using a too-bright backlight in a dark environment is not just about bleeding through an IPS panel. You're screwing with your vision when you stare at such a bright display in a dark environment. The bright parts are so bright that they cause the iris of your eyes to shrink and this impairs your perception of dark detail. If you want to see the best image quality in your games, photos and movies, you need to select a brightness that is correct for the ambient light level so your eyes will work their best. Selecting a brightness setting that is best for your eyes has nothing to do with backlight bleed and it's why such standards exist for calibrating displays for professional use by photo editors, video editors, 3D renderers---anyone who needs to see accurate life-like color.

I use an i1Display Pro colorimeter and i1 Profiler Pro software (both by X-Rite / Pantone) to calibrate all of my displays. It measures the ambient light of the room and sets the brightness of the display accordingly. Profiles could be created for different ambient light levels. Then, when you change the room light level, you manually adjust the brightness to the level required by your profile and load the profile. If pro-quality color is what you need, these are the kinds of steps you take. Some of the calibration systems will monitor the ambient light throughout the day and automatically adjust the display for you---but these auto adjustments are never as good as individual calibrations.

I wouldn't expect average computer users to do the kinds of things I do. But I'm just trying to show that there is a science to this that most users are ignorant about. Sadly, many manufacturers and sales persons are, too.

Tedium
What's so tedious about use Fn+UpArrow and Fn+DnArrow to quickly change the backlight brightness. It's so easy to do! I fail to see why changing the brightness to fit your ambient light level is any kind of hassle. It sounds like someone is lazy! ;D

Kind regards, David
 

veeras.44

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Well , where to start :)  I can visualize the way you love your notebook and I dont think any novice (like me) can converse actively about display & its technology with you!.. You gave me all possible reasons as to why I should stick with MSI Notebooks.
Thanks once again for your detailed response and I will start exploring about display calibration in parallel before I get my new one.
Regards Veera.
 
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