MSI B550-A PRO: Drivers, Windows 10 and BIOS-settings?

Mr.Drummer

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Hi, i'm gonna upgrade to a new budget PC the coming week when i have a little nore time on my hands. It's been a while though, 7-years i reckon, since i last built a PC so i'm feeling a bit rusty and anxious and therefore have some questions that i've been thinking about. I would apprecíate if someone could take the time and to the best of their knowledge try to help me.

What i'm upgrading to
MSI B550-A PRO
Ryzen 7 3700X
Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 3200MHZ
XPG SX8200 PRO 512GB (M.2 2280 PCIe Gen3x4 SSD) + 250GB Crucial MX500 SSD (SATA)
EVGA GTX 980 Ti (from my old PC)


1. Should i install the "AM4 RAID Driver" and "AMD Graphics Drivers" if i'm not gonna have my drives in a RAID-configuration and i already have a dedicated graphics card (referring to the Graphics Drivers)? See the attached picture where i've circled the mentioned drivers.

2. After a clean innstall of Windows 10, what's best?
A. First go through all the Windows updates an then install the drivers for the motherboard.
B. First install all the drivers for the motherboard and then go though all the Windows updates.
C. It doesn really matter where i start.

3. When installing Windows 10 on a M.2 NVME SSD is there some setting i must go though first in the BIOS (excluding setting the boot-priority to reading from the USB-drives first, because i already know about that one) to make it as smooth as possible. I've found this explanation online but it's pretty long, but maybe someone's got the time to read through it and give me his/her opinion on how relevant it is.

Thanks in advance/Izak
__________________________________________________________________
Here is the procedure for install of Windows on a Nvme drive.

1 - Make sure you unplug all SATA and USB drives, the M.2 drive has to be the only drive installed.
2 - Go into the bios, under the boot tab there is an option for CSM, make sure it is disabled.
3 - Click on secure boot option below and make sure it is set to other OS, Not windows UEFI.
4 - Click on key management and clear secure boot keys.
5 - Insert a USB memory stick with a UEFI bootable iso of Windows 10 on it.
6 - Press F10 to save, exit and reboot.
7 - Windows will now start installing to your NVME drive as it has its own NVME driver built in.
8 - When the PC reboots hit F2 to go back into the BIOS, you will see under boot priority that windows boot manager now lists your NVME drive.
9 - Click on secure boot again but now set it to WIndows UEFI mode.
10 - Click on key management and install default secure boot keys
11 - Press F10 to save and exit and windows will finish the install.
 

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eqwebbie_with_PC

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Hi,
I would advise to take yourself a little time. More time means less mistakes. ;)

To your questions:
1. No, you don't have to install those.
2. A. First Windows updates, then drivers.
Because the latest drivers might only work with the latest Windows updates, and it is easier to identify possible issues during the installation process. It is very important to reboot the system after the last Windows update and before installing any drivers.
The first driver should be the chipset driver. Reboot.
The second the GPU driver. Reboot.
After this, any other driver. Those don't need a separate reboot in most cases.
After installing all drivers, the final reboot.
3. You should check in Bios if boot mode is set to UEFI. CSM mode should only be used if some components need it explicitly.

Good luck and much fun with your new system. 😀
 
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Mr.Drummer

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Hi,
I would advise to take yourself a little time. More time means less mistakes. ;)

To your questions:
1. No, you don't have to install those.
2. A. First Windows updates, then drivers.
Because the latest drivers might only work with the latest Windows updates, and it is easier to identify possible issues during the installation process. It is very important to reboot the system after the last Windows update and before installing any drivers.
The first driver should be the chipset driver. Reboot.
The second the GPU driver. Reboot.
After this, any other driver. Those don't need a separate reboot in most cases.
After installing all drivers, the final reboot.
3. You should check in Bios if boot mode is set to UEFI. CSM mode should only be used if some components need it explicitly.

Good luck and much fun with your new system. 😀
Thanks for the reply and the explanation. A couple oif more though if you've got the time :)

What are the "AMD Graphics Drivers" for, an APU with both CPU and GPU (like alot of Intel CPUs have)?
So, i shouldn't install all the drivers for the motherboard (that is Chipset, Audio and LAN) before i move on to things like the GPU?

Thanks
Izak
 

eqwebbie_with_PC

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Thanks for the reply and the explanation. A couple oif more though if you've got the time :)

What are the "AMD Graphics Drivers" for, an APU with both CPU and GPU (like alot of Intel CPUs have)?
So, i shouldn't install all the drivers for the motherboard (that is Chipset, Audio and LAN) before i move on to things like the GPU?

Thanks
Izak
Hi,
you are correct, the AMD graphics drivers are only for those APUs (CPU with builtin graphics unit). Those CPUs have the letter "G" at the end. As you are having an Nvidia GPU, you only need the Nvidia drivers.

The first driver to install is always the chipset driver, then the GPU. Those are the ones that change the most system files and always need a reboot. Also, sometimes you don't see the complete installation window of other drivers if you don't change the GPU resolution to your full screen size first. ;)

Everything else, Audio, LAN etc. comes after this.

One last hint for installation: Since last year, Microsoft wants to force users to create remote Windows login accounts, but you don't have to. If you want a local Windows account, just don't configure your WIFI (or don't plug in your ethernet) during Windows installation, and you are able to create a local Windows account.
 

Mr.Drummer

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Hi,
you are correct, the AMD graphics drivers are only for those APUs (CPU with builtin graphics unit). Those CPUs have the letter "G" at the end. As you are having an Nvidia GPU, you only need the Nvidia drivers.

The first driver to install is always the chipset driver, then the GPU. Those are the ones that change the most system files and always need a reboot. Also, sometimes you don't see the complete installation window of other drivers if you don't change the GPU resolution to your full screen size first. ;)

Everything else, Audio, LAN etc. comes after this.

One last hint for installation: Since last year, Microsoft wants to force users to create remote Windows login accounts, but you don't have to. If you want a local Windows account, just don't configure your WIFI (or don't plug in your ethernet) during Windows installation, and you are able to create a local Windows account.
Thanks again, i also sent the question to MSi Customer Support directly and despite the holiday they've already replied, i'm prety impressed by this, i've only dealt with Asus Customer Support before (this is my first experience of MSI motherboards) and it took some days before they came back to me. What do they mean by "Optimized Deafults" though, i've never heard of that before? Also, what's the difference between entering the BIOS (and set the boot-priority there) and hit F11 (as suggested by MSI) during post and choose the USB-stick here instead, is this only a one time boot option? This is what MSI said:

--------------------------------------------------
Dear retrysak ,

Thanks for contacting MSI technical support.

Regarding your concern, please enter BIOS, press F6 to load optimized defaults, press F10 to save and reset. Then please press F11 during the post to choose USB installation stick to install Windows.
After system installation, please use Windows Update to install all the updates, download and install latest AMD Chipset Driver, Realtek HD Universal Driver and Realtek PCI-E Ethernet Drivers from MSI website to use. Thanks!

https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/B550-A-PRO#down-driver&Win10 64

Thanks for your cooperation in advance!

Best Regards,

MSI Technical Support Team
------------------------------------------------
 
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eqwebbie_with_PC

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Optimized defaults is what other manufacturers call just defaults.
F11 is for choosing the boot device without entering bios. As you already figured, it is a one time boot option.
 

Mr.Drummer

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Optimized defaults is what other manufacturers call just defaults.
F11 is for choosing the boot device without entering bios. As you already figured, it is a one time boot option.
Aha, ok. The thing i don't really understand though is. If i start with Windows Update and then move on to the motherboard drivers won't i just install the same drivers over again in some cases? I know that Windows Update does a pretty good job of finding and installing the releveant drivers. And if the drivers the Windows Update finds and installs are older isn't it best to first remove them before installing the ones find on on the MSI site. I know that when it comes to installing new drivers for a GPU for example it's advised to do a "clean install", doesn't this apply motherboard drivers aswell? Sorry if i ask alot but you've supplied me with the best info i've gotten yet and i really want to understand how it works.
 

eqwebbie_with_PC

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Oh,
you are asking things that I never saw as a problem... :unsure:
a) Device Drivers
The device manufacturer always has the latest drivers on his download site. So if you install the drivers from the manufacturers site in the last step, you always end up with the latest driver versions in your system. If this exact driver version has already been installed by Windows, then most installation routines will quit after telling you so. If an older driver has been installed, the new driver calls the deinstallation routine for the older driver first. In my experience, this happens most visibly with Realtek audio drivers: The new version deinstalls the old driver, reboots, and then installs the new version.
b) Windows Update
To be sure that the latest manufacturer drivers work, you have to install all Windows updates before.
c) Security
If you install all Windows updates first, your PC is much safer because Windows Defender and Windows itself have all security updates.
After this, you can even search the Web for the latest drivers with a much smaller security risk than with an unpatched system. This is a big advantage especially for those people that only have one system and need to download the drivers with the system they just installed.
 
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Mr.Drummer

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Oh,
you are asking things that I never saw as a problem... :unsure:
a) Device Drivers
The device manufacturer always has the latest drivers on his download site. So if you install the drivers from the manufacturers site in the last step, you always end up with the latest driver versions in your system. If this exact driver version has already been installed by Windows, then most installation routines will quit after telling you so. If an older driver has been installed, the new driver calls the deinstallation routine for the older driver first. In my experience, this happens most visibly with Realtek audio drivers: The new version deinstalls the old driver, reboots, and then installs the new version.
b) Windows Update
To be sure that the latest manufacturer drivers work, you have to install all Windows updates before.
c) Security
If you install all Windows updates first, your PC is much safer because Windows Defender and Windows itself have all security updates.
After this, you can even search the Web for the latest drivers with a much smaller security risk than with an unpatched system. This is a big advantage especially for those people that only have one system and need to download the drivers with the system they just installed.
Thanks alot for the clarification. One more question though and then i feel as prepared as i can be for tomorrows build adventure. I’ve read that i should have a look at the motherboards QVL before i buy RAM, unfortunately i didn’t do that and when i tried today i found it difficult to search through the QVL and find what i was looking for. The motherboard i’m basing my build on is the ”MSI B550-A Pro” and the ram in question is the ”Corsair Vengeance LPX Black 16 GB DDR4 3600MHz CL18 (CMK16GX4M2Z3600C18)”. Could you help me look of this particular brand and model is on the QVL?, i would appreciate that alot.
 

Mr.Drummer

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The RAM QVL is only a suggestion, nothing more.
Did you succeed?
Unfortunately the 3700X that i bought second hand came with a bent pin, it was a sneaky one though and it looked like the CPU was firmly seated in the socket, and when i pushed down on the lever even more pins got bent. I decided to buy a completely new 3700X and sell this old one as an defective CPU with bent pins, maybe someone with more experience than me can bend them straight again, i don’t know. All in all, i’m just waiting for the new CPU to arrive and then i’ll give it a go again. If i only knew how ”fragile” the pins on the Ryzen CPUs are, maybe i could’ve avoided this accident, but you live and learn...the hard way.
 
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eqwebbie_with_PC

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Thanks, those M.2 screws are really small though. I had to borrow my brothers ”mini screwdriver” ’cause all mine were to big.
Oh yeah, I know this issue.
Thankfully, I've accumulated half a dozen of those over the years, as they often come with certain external enclosures.
 

Mr.Drummer

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Oh yeah, I know this issue.
Thankfully, I've accumulated half a dozen of those over the years, as they often come with certain external enclosures.
Hi, i just wanted to let you know that we built the PC yesterday and everything went just fine (no pins bent this time). My wife helped me so we made an adventure out of it trying to get the cable management just perfect, and we did a pretty good job i think. I really like the premium look of the "Corsair 4000D Airflow" and we chose to put it up on my shelf in an orientation so i/we can always see the inside of the PC through the glass panel. If you've got the time i've taken two screenhots of both "Ryzen Master" and "HWMonitor", does the temps look normal to you? I think it's pretty good considering i'm still using an old Noctua cooler from 2008. I took out the front fan though and replaced it with two 140mm fans from an old Fractal Design Define R5 so maybe that helps with the overall temp of the system. What i find strange though is two things:

1. In HW Monitor i can't see the individual temperatures for all the cores (like i could with my old i5 4690K), but instead a reading for CPU and something called "Package Node 0", is this normal with Ryzen CPUs?

2. The temp for the CPU is pretty constant but the "Package Node 0" jumps around alot between...let's say 32 Celsius and 42 Celsius and this is without any programs running, is this normal?
 

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eqwebbie_with_PC

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Hi,
glad to read all went well.
Overall, the temps look very good. In regard to hwmonitor, I never used this tool so I dunno what it shows.
Have fun with your new system. 😀
 

Alan J T

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Hi, i just wanted to let you know that we built the PC yesterday and everything went just fine (no pins bent this time). My wife helped me so we made an adventure out of it trying to get the cable management just perfect, and we did a pretty good job i think. I really like the premium look of the "Corsair 4000D Airflow" and we chose to put it up on my shelf in an orientation so i/we can always see the inside of the PC through the glass panel. If you've got the time i've taken two screenhots of both "Ryzen Master" and "HWMonitor", does the temps look normal to you? I think it's pretty good considering i'm still using an old Noctua cooler from 2008. I took out the front fan though and replaced it with two 140mm fans from an old Fractal Design Define R5 so maybe that helps with the overall temp of the system. What i find strange though is two things:

1. In HW Monitor i can't see the individual temperatures for all the cores (like i could with my old i5 4690K), but instead a reading for CPU and something called "Package Node 0", is this normal with Ryzen CPUs?

2. The temp for the CPU is pretty constant but the "Package Node 0" jumps around alot between...let's say 32 Celsius and 42 Celsius and this is without any programs running, is this normal?
Ya is quite normal lots of background stuff cause minor CPU spikes to test the cooling I would run Cinebench to see if it stays below 90C You can set Cinebench for one run or on a loop but that is not need for Air Coolers I have set the BIOS to what I want it to do and have a somewhat beefy cooler and have set my Thermal Throttle to 90c instead of the normal 95c to 100c. I believe that this is what you want to see under full load temp wise less than 80c


Full Load run max temp 77.4c
Screenshot 2021-04-11 200338.jpg


System at Idle Temps vary from 38c to 50c under normal Idle settings. I have my Fan curver set to 30% up to 50c and then up to 50% at 50C and 70% at 65c then 100% at 75C
Screenshot 2021-04-11 200408.jpg
 

Mr.Drummer

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Hi,
glad to read all went well.
Overall, the temps look very good. In regard to hwmonitor, I never used this tool so I dunno what it shows.
Have fun with your new system. 😀
Ok, good to know, thanks. What’s your opinion on Ryzen Master btw, is it an accurate reading of the CPU temps or are there programs out there that works better with Ryzen based systems?
 
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