Z370-A PRO BIOS time up to 5 min.

beldan4

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Nov 26, 2018
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Hello, My BIOS time used to be really fast. Then one day I had some error occur, and the MOBO went into "diagonsic mode" it takes 5 min to get to the BIOS menu. The trouble now, is it won't stop doing it. I pulled the battery to try to clear the CMOS. I Flash updated the BIOS. Nothing works, it still takes 4-5 min from a computer reset for it to check everything (POST?). Suggestions?
 

citay

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Can you please list all your components?

What error did occur exactly? What did you do at the time?
 

beldan4

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Can you please list all your components?

What error did occur exactly? What did you do at the time?
Honestly, I don't know what I did. The game I was playing froze up (emulator server it happens), which froze up windows so I had to directly turn off the power supply. From that point I thought I was having Black screens of death till I realised that it was just doing a prolonged systems check. I thought due to the game that the graphics card might be at fualt, so I pulled it out, replaced it with my old one, and then when that didn't solve the problem I stuck the new one back in. Other than pulling the battery for 20 min, and flash updating the BIOS (it keeps track of the time, and holds the update so it's not the battery or memory). I tried disconnecting the hard drives and every other device but the GPU and still takes just as long to get into the BIOS. It's like something locked the system check and it won't stop. I looked at the instructions for the "fast boot" option, but there isn't one.

Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-8100 CPU @ 3.60 GHz
GPU WAS Geforce GT 730 - Was upgraded 2 weeks ago to a EVGA 06G-P4-1068-KR GeForce GTX 1660 Super Sc Ultra Gaming, 6GB GDDR6 (sorry but MSI screwed me once with RMA, and blamed it on Me and Fedex so I shy away from their components now)
16 Gig RAM
250 EVO SSD
 

citay

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What's your CPU cooler and your PSU?

Can you try booting with just one stick of RAM (try all four slots if necessary)?
 

beldan4

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citay

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I don't trust that power supply.

This is a cheap group regulated design, and those are often hysterically bad at doing zero loads on any one rail. And in this case, we have worse results than usual. Like the 450BV, this unit is far more comfortable with one crossload test than the other, and that test is once again CL1. You know, where things are skewed to represent ancient 5V heavy rigs.
Seriously, nothing is out of spec on CL1, but everything is out of spec on CL2. All voltages, including the 3.3V. Don’t run this with a modern rig, peoples. As a result of this, the load regulation numbers work out to 5.82% on the 3.3V, 11.60% on the 5V, and 9.50% on the 12V. Mediocrity all the way along, and if you ever see your rig pulling numbers like CL2 has, you will be shopping for new hardware in short order. And this is actually possible now with modern builds that don’t disable advanced sleep states.

Test CL1 went fine, again telling me that this unit was designed for old 5V based hardware. But test CL2? Now, I had a problem in addition to all voltages being out of spec. In that test, the 3.3V rail started creeping upwards. Slowly but surely, it climbed higher and higher, ending up at a staggering 3.562V with no sign of stopping there. Given the way things were heading, I have very little doubt that the unit was getting ready to blow the 3.3V output parts, throwing the unit into protective shutdown (or perhaps even outright exploding) until said parts were replaced. The only reason it didn’t do that is that the full ten minutes of the test passed and I shut it down manually.
Of course, this means we have even worse results for voltage regulation. 7.48% on the 3.3V rail, 11.80% on the 5V, and 9.50% on the 12V. The average is 9.59%, or about double the ATX spec. All because these old group designs were never meant to be good at handling things modern systems throw at them.

The PSU is one of the things i would never skimp on. Well, obviously, cause my 550W PSU cost me a cool 115 EUR / 135 USD. But it has 80 PLUS Platinum efficiency and 12 years of warranty. This is gonna supply ultra-stable, ultra-clean voltages to my components for years to come, while barely outputting any waste heat whatsoever.

Even if you don't have such high standards, i believe an 80 PLUS Gold unit is a good investment. These very cheap 80 PLUS Bronze units just have too many caveats (let alone the straight 80 PLUS ones = no Bronze). If they use an old design, they're no good for modern hardware, because almost all the load these days is pulled from the 12V line, and that's what that old PSU design can't handle.

So, apart from the problem you're having, meaning, no matter if it solves it or not, i would get a better PSU, first thing. Any modern Intel or AMD CPU will have short current spikes on the 12V that your PSU is ill-equipped to handle.
 

beldan4

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Nov 26, 2018
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Ok, well I am upgrading everything else bit by bit. Might as well add that to the list. Thanks.
 

beldan4

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I don't trust that power supply.







The PSU is one of the things i would never skimp on. Well, obviously, cause my 550W PSU cost me a cool 115 EUR / 135 USD. But it has 80 PLUS Platinum efficiency and 12 years of warranty. This is gonna supply ultra-stable, ultra-clean voltages to my components for years to come, while barely outputting any waste heat whatsoever.

Even if you don't have such high standards, i believe an 80 PLUS Gold unit is a good investment. These very cheap 80 PLUS Bronze units just have too many caveats (let alone the straight 80 PLUS ones = no Bronze). If they use an old design, they're no good for modern hardware, because almost all the load these days is pulled from the 12V line, and that's what that old PSU design can't handle.

So, apart from the problem you're having, meaning, no matter if it solves it or not, i would get a better PSU, first thing. Any modern Intel or AMD CPU will have short current spikes on the 12V that your PSU is ill-equipped to handle.
Not sure if you'll still see this but bought PSU on newegg. Was on sale, but for me it was still dang expensive (all PSU's are expensive now I can't even consider platinum) I hope this is sufficient.
 

beldan4

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Not sure if you'll still see this but bought PSU on newegg. Was on sale, but for me it was still dang expensive (all PSU's are expensive now I can't even consider platinum) I hope this is sufficient.
Success. Just to be safe with my computer incase I was drawing too much power then my PSU could put out in unplugged my Bluray, and my 2 HDD's. Problem solved. I guess it was a PSU problem. Now I'll just have to hope that the PSU I bought when install will in fact fix the problem with everything plugged in. Thanks so much for the advice!
 

citay

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You're welcome!

Yes, any 80 PLUS Gold PSU will do. This certification already ensures that they have to use decent components, otherwise they couldn't achieve that.
10 year warranty is also nice to have, and a vote of confidence from the manufacturer that they don't sell trash.
 

flyingv2815b702e7

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Thanks for the reference to the article. It makes a good point about the
fact that today's system are 12V dependent not 5V like the old days.

We are seeing what I think are a lot of power problems these days as
the older PSUs people have, or the cheapy newer ones, are behind
the times in their ability to support a modern CPU and GPU.

If for example the output capacitors on the 12V rail are not of sufficient capacity,
or if they have poor ESR ratings, this could mean trouble. If I buy the best caps
for the job, Nichicon or United Chemi-Con are good Japanese brands, it will cost
a LOT more than generic capacitors.

Here is something often misunderstood about caps, their hour rating.
For computer applications, good caps come in 10000 hour, 12000 hour
and 18000 hour varieties. The hourly rating is NOT a total lifetime expectancy.
It is amount of time that the cap can work normally in hot, stressful conditions.
Keep them cool for longest possible life.

As was pointed out, if you pay more for a PSU you should get better caps,
with sufficient capacity, low ESR, and a long hourly rating. What names can you trust?
This is really hard because every company makes a line of very good ones,
and a cheaper line of so-so units.

Edit: Maybe someday the PSU will be 12V heavy plus a 5V standby power.
Let the boards or peripherals do their own low voltage regulation like CPU, RAM, GPU, etc.
 

dvair

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If your power supply is modular - DO NOT reuse your existing cables. Only use ones that come with the power supply.
 

beldan4

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Nov 26, 2018
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You're welcome!

Yes, any 80 PLUS Gold PSU will do. This certification already ensures that they have to use decent components, otherwise they couldn't achieve that.
10 year warranty is also nice to have, and a vote of confidence from the manufacturer that they don't sell trash.
Well I finally Discovered what the problem was (after I bought and installed the PSU). It wasn't the PSU....anyone wanna guess? It was......A disc in the bluray drive. Near as I can guess the BIOS on the motherboard kept trying to boot up / spin / get information off a disc I had stuck in my bluray drive. This resulted in the BIOS taking 5 min to load up, I guess it was designed to make ABSOLUTELY SURE that the disc didn't contain something it needed to know before it gave up and ran the BIOS normally. So I am posting this reply just incase someone else has this issue, and also so other people can examine this potentially frustrating issue. I'm not sure if I should be pleased that the MOBO is so careful or PISSED that they didn't warn me about this little issue.

As for the PSU, well I was upgrading my CPU anyway and the old PSU wasn't going to cut it anyway. So I am glad this issue forced me to upgrade.
 
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