Z690 Force Wifi

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Aug 9, 2022
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Turns out my motherboard needed a BIOS update to run a 12900KS and 3090Ti. I sent my MSI 3090Ti Suprim in for an RMA because DCS (Digital Combat Simulator) kept crashing during play. When it returned I reinstalled it, the motherboard VGA light was now on (probably was before too, not sure) and DCS play was even worse but did not crash. Now, I've never done a BIOS flash and the fear of bricking it kept me from wanting to update it. I figured I'd bite the bullet and get it done. Other than having an issue logging back into Windows, in which I figured out via YouTube, I have successfully updated my BIOS. VGA debug light is gone and everything seems to be working normally. I'll give DCS a try in a few. If it goes wrong I'll update here.
 

citay

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Yeah, when you use a CPU that has come out after the board was released, you usually need a BIOS update that adds proper support for it. The BIOS contains so-called microcode, which configures each supported CPU model during the POST process and even adds fixes and enhancements for that CPU. There is no risk of bricking with most of the recent boards, because they have a Flash BIOS Button. This function can recover even from a failed flash, it can blindly force-flash the latest BIOS to the board even if the currently installed BIOS became corrupted. So there's very little risk involved with a BIOS update on such boards.

You should keep updating the BIOS to the newest versions, the 600-series boards' BIOS is still a lot "under construction" so to speak, meaning they still fix some important bugs in the new updates.
 
Joined
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Yeah, when you use a CPU that has come out after the board was released, you usually need a BIOS update that adds proper support for it. The BIOS contains so-called microcode, which configures each supported CPU model during the POST process and even adds fixes and enhancements for that CPU. There is no risk of bricking with most of the recent boards, because they have a Flash BIOS Button. This function can recover even from a failed flash, it can blindly force-flash the latest BIOS to the board even if the currently installed BIOS became corrupted. So there's very little risk involved with a BIOS update on such boards.

You should keep updating the BIOS to the newest versions, the 600-series boards' BIOS is still a lot "under construction" so to speak, meaning they still fix some important bugs in the new updates.
I agree about keeping your system updated. There's always a notation somewhere saying "If you're not having a problem with your motherboard, you don't need to update it." Having only a VGA debug light and a system that operated lead me to believe that the issue was not the motherboard. Going through the BIOS updates I noticed that one of them had support for the 12900KS exclusively. I also bought my board in June so I automatically assumed that it was only missing the July BIOS update. Come to find out my BIOS was the original release version. I should have expected that but technically I'm still a noob at building. Even after building 15 rigs.

I appreciate your insight.
 

citay

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Yeah, they BIOS on the boards will usually be very old. For example, it already takes more than a month for the board to be shipped from China/Taiwan to most other places. And of course they don't always put the newest BIOS on the boards immediately at the factory either.

Nowadays i disagree with the old notion of "never change a running system". It came from a time where the BIOS code was simpler. Today, new BIOS updates are relevant for optimal performance since they bring new microcode, also they fix some important things, many of which doesn't even appear in the changelogs! I commented about it here before, and here is an example where updating to a beta BIOS (with zero mention of anything in regards to RAM in the changelog) fixed a RAM problem.

On my Z590, they really improved the performance in some circumstances with the newer microcode. The original BIOS was from a rushed release date and they had a lot of room for optimization.
On Z690 it seems much the same, and this time, there are lots of known bugs to be fixed, like standby bugs, RAM problems and so on. And they improve/fix so many other things behind the scenes that never makes it into the changelogs. Some of it may not affect you, some of it can save you lots of trouble down the road, or even improve some performance aspect.

Back in the day, when BIOS development was a bit easier and the motherboard companies didn't release twenty different board models for each platform, some of the BIOS updates perhaps weren't as important as they are today. The initial release BIOS was more polished to begin with. Nowadays, we have "bananaware": The BIOS the boards ship with is totally green. Some people are discovering bugs within ten minutes of using the board. You have to keep applying the newest BIOS updates when they come out, in order to have a product that doesn't cause you lots of headaches.
 
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Joined
Aug 9, 2022
Messages
3
Yeah, they BIOS on the boards will usually be very old. For example, it already takes more than a month for the board to be shipped from China/Taiwan to most other places. And of course they don't always put the newest BIOS on the boards immediately at the factory either.

Nowadays i disagree with the old notion of "never change a running system". It came from a time where the BIOS code was simpler. Today, new BIOS updates are relevant for optimal performance since they bring new microcode, also they fix some important things, many of which doesn't even appear in the changelogs! I commented about it here before, and here is an example where updating to a beta BIOS (with zero mention of anything in regards to RAM in the changelog) fixed a RAM problem.

On my Z590, they really improved the performance in some circumstances with the newer microcode. The original BIOS was from a rushed release date and they had a lot of room for optimization.
On Z690 it seems much the same, and this time, there are lots of known bugs to be fixed, like standby bugs, RAM problems and so on. And they improve/fix so many other things behind the scenes that never makes it into the changelogs. Some of it may not affect you, some of it can save you lots of trouble down the road, or even improve some performance aspect.

Back in the day, when BIOS development was a bit easier and the motherboard companies didn't release 20 different board models for each platform, some of the BIOS updates perhaps weren't as important as they are today. Nowadays, we have "bananaware": The BIOS the boards ship with is totally green. You have to keep applying the newest BIOS updates when they come out, in order to have a product that doesn't cause you lots of headaches.
Lesson learned. Thanks again.
 
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