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Author Topic: MSI Driver Installation Sequence  (Read 19072 times)

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davidTopic starter

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MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« on: 25-May-18, 17:34:34 »

Greetings,

Doing a clean install of Microsoft Windows on an MSI gaming notebook can be a bit tricky. After Windows has been installed, the user must then install all of the MSI drivers. Here's the tricky part: They should be installed in a particular sequence. MSI used to list the correct sequence for each model at the top of the driver download page for the model. As soon as you selected the version of Windows you desired drivers for, the installation sequence would be listed at the top of the page and the driver downloads would be listed next. IMPORTANT: The order the downloads are listed is NOT the order they should be installed.

Strangely, these MSI driver installation sequences are now missing from MSI's website since it was updated a few weeks ago. Using the MSI driver installation sequence for my GT80 2QE Titan, I've prepared the following general sequence with a few notes. Most MSI gaming notebooks will probably use a similar sequence. Hopefully it will help until MSI discovers their omission and restores the information.
 
 
MSI Driver Installation Sequence

01 - Chipset (Intel)
02 - IRST (Intel Rapid Storage Technology)
03 - Intel Graphics (iGPU - integrated Intel GPU)
04 - NVidia Graphics (dGPU - discrete NVidia GPU)
05 - Audio (always install Realtek HD audio driver first, optional Nahimic effects software second)
06 - LAN (make sure this matches your hardware: Killer vs Intel)
07 - Card Reader (Realtek)
08 - WLAN (wireless LAN - make sure this matches your hardware: Killer vs Intel)
09 - BT (Bluetooth - make sure this matches your hardware: Killer vs Intel)
10 - Touchpad (Synaptics)
11 - ME (Intel Management Engine)
12 - Radio Switch (Windows 8.x and 10 only)

Note 1: GT series notebooks like my GT80 2QE whose motherboards support dual dGPUs in SLI will have a hardware "GPU" button. They are unique in that the circuitry for only one GPU system is active at a time (iGPU or dGPU). With most other MSI gaming notebooks, both the iGPU and dGPU circuitry are active at the same time. This is because the iGPU serves as the full-time display controller even when the dGPU is doing the rendering. For GT notebooks, the GPU button is controlled by MSI's SCM (System Control Manager) utility software. For these GT notebooks, the SCM must be installed between steps 03 and 04 so the GPU button can be used to switch on the NVidia dGPU(s) prior to installing the NVidia graphics driver. The NVidia graphics driver cannot be installed while the dGPU circuitry is inactive because it won't be able to find it. All non-GT series notebooks that lack support for SLI do not need the SCM to be installed this early---it can be installed after all the drivers have been installed. But the SCM should be the first MSI utility software that you install because some of the other utilities (like the MSI Dragon Center) depend on it.

Note 2: Some MSI gaming notebook models may have Intel networking hardware and others may have Killer (Qualcomm) networking hardware. As a result, MSI may offer drivers for both Intel and Killer. Only install the network drivers that match your hardware. This includes wired LAN (ethernet), WLAN (wireless LAN or WiFi) and BT (Bluetooth). Also, some of the drivers may be combined. For example, Killer may combine the LAN and WLAN drivers into a single download but Intel may have separate downloads for LAN and WLAN.

Note 3: Don't confuse the Realtek drivers. Realtek makes audio processors and they make card reader processors. These are separate products and require separate drivers. So you'll have a Realtek HD audio driver for the sound. And you'll have a separate Realtek card reader driver for the memory card reader slot in the side of your notebook.

Kind regards, David
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marktaraoliver

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Re: MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« Reply #1 on: 16-August-18, 04:49:09 »

Awsome write up , thank you !

The original MSI configuration i "Think" uses tricks to help run the CPU at higher clock speeds
Do you not need the original install for this to work ?

Or are there settings that can be changed manually ?

Thanks again

Mark
GT72VR 6RE DOMINATOR PRO
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davidTopic starter

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Re: MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« Reply #2 on: 16-August-18, 13:45:38 »

Hi Mark,

The answer depends on the age of your MSI gaming notebook. Older models that pre-date Win 10 (like my GT80 2QE) do not include CPU overclocking software from MSI. They have MSI's Dragon Gaming Center software which monitors the CPU and dGPU temperature and cooling fan speeds, etc. With these older notebooks, you need to download and install Intel's free XTU software (eXtreme Tuning Utility) to overclock or underclock the CPU. The XTU is the "gold standard" software for Intel CPUs. To overclock the dGPU in these older notebooks, you need to download and install MSI's Afterburner software. Afterburner was originally designed for MSI's gaming desktop motherboards and some of its features are not available when it's used in a gaming notebook but it is the best choice to overclock or underclock a dGPU in an older MSI gaming notebook. Finally, to manually control the cooling profile of the fans, MSI provided a beta copy of its Silent Option software. However, it was never released in a "final" form and, since it is beta code, it is known to have a few bugs.

Newer models that came with Win 10 (like your GT72VR 6RE) use MSI's Dragon Center software. It is a major overhaul of the older Dragon Gaming Center. The new Dragon Center includes overclocking controls for both the CPU and dGPU. Plus is also includes cooling profile controls. The idea behind the new Dragon Center is to provide a single program from which you can configure your gaming notebook. They even includes links to its other utility programs like Nahimic for sound, True Color for display, etc. But the relevant point is this: With MSI's Dragon Center, you won't need to install Intel's XTU nor MSI's Afterburner or Silent Option programs because the Dragon Center does it all.

Personally, I dislike Win 10 immensely and will be leaving the Microsoft Windows fold when Microsoft stops providing security updates for Win 7. I've been a Microsoft Windows developer since the early 80's (since Windows 2.0). But Microsoft has lost its way, in my opinion. So the clock is running out on me and Windows. The same is true for my company, which also plans to discontinue Windows support. As for MSI, their decision to switch to A-Volute's Nahimic software was a disaster and you couldn't pay me to install and use it. The fact that they failed to license the Dolby Digital Live capability embedded in the Realtek audio chips is appalling. And I don't feel any better about MSI's True Color software. I calibrate my displays professionally with X-Rite (Pantone) i1Display Pro colorimeter and software.

So, whether or not you decide to go with all of MSI's latest utility programs is your choice. The only utility that is mandatory (in my opinion) is MSI's SCM (System Control Manager) because it is essential for controlling and operating some important low-level functions that affect the cooling, all radios (wifi, bluetooth), keyboard, etc. And, if you choose not to install MSI's Dragon Center, you could install Intel's XTU to overclock or underclock your CPU. For that matter, MSI's afterburner may still work also for the dGPU under Win 10---but I'm not sure.

Kind regards, David
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GT80 2QE Titan SLI-001 • i7-4720HQ • 32 GB DRAM • 2 x GTX 980M in SLI • 16 GB VRAM (8 GB/GPU) • 2 x 512 GB Micron M600 M.2 SSDs in mirrored Recovery array • 2 x 128 Toshiba M.2 SSDs in mirrored RAID-1 • 2 TB Samsung 850 EVO SSD • MiniPro RAID V2 external case w/ 2 x 2 TB Seagate ST2000LM003 HD in RAID-1 for local backup • 40" Philips 4K UHD BDM4065UC monitor • Logitech G910 Orion Spectrum RGB external keyboard • Logitech G903 Lightspeed wireless mouse w/ Powerplay charging mousepad • Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit • Adobe Master Collection CS6

marktaraoliver

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Re: MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« Reply #3 on: 17-August-18, 07:58:12 »

Hi David,

Awesome response, thank you 

I have installed the drivers in order and the SCM and ignored XTU and MSI overclock, but put Dragon center on. 
Good to know i got it right !

I only installed the Audio driver the Nahimic software does not add any benefit and actually does not work as intended anyway (Elite at least)

I only use this machine for gaming, Elite Dangerous to be specific in VR, it does ok but recently had a catastrophic failure, One MONTH at the MSI service center in the UK and its had a new Motherboard and Graphics card and 'Power module' what ever that was ! also looks like the keyboard was changed 

Im no PC expert but not a noob either, i pale in comparison to your knowledge and appreciate the time you have taken to respond to my question 

Thank you 

Mark
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JasperW

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Re: MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« Reply #4 on: 05-November-18, 02:00:15 »

sorry to dig up this old topic,

but what about USB drivers? I have ASMedia USB drivers on my GE62VR 6RF laptop. Where do they fit in? In between IRST (Intel Rapid Storage Technology) and Intel Graphics (iGPU - integrated Intel GPU)?
I might, scratch that, will need USB access for an external drive with the installation files.
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marktaraoliver

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Re: MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« Reply #5 on: 05-November-18, 05:59:11 »

I play games in VR with a Windows headset Samsung Odessey, Mixed reality does not like the ASMedia USB drivers, so I use the default windows drivers. 

My issue right now is I cannot get windows hello to work! And I have spent hours messing with windows settings, security configurations etc.
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JasperW

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Re: MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« Reply #6 on: 05-November-18, 08:28:57 »

I am fairly certain my USB-C port does not work properly without the ASMedia USB driver. Only since I've updated them does the USB C port work properly with my USB-C splitter and connections for like with my cellphone.
If I had to guess I assume it was for USB extensible host driver or root hub driver it provides.
Otherwise I never had any problems with ASMedia drivers, I am now using v1.16.54.1 without problems.
However, if I understand you correctly, to come back to my original question, it would seem that you're implying that with a reinstall and then using windows automatically installed USB drivers the classic USB ports will work and I will be able to use external USB drives via those ports.
Question still remains then where in the installation sequence one has to install the ASMedia drivers.

I dislike the windows connectivity and features such as Hello, I just use an old fashioned username and password. If it were me Windows 10 could do without all that. On the other hand I use the laptop more for other stuff than playing games.
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davidTopic starter

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Re: MSI Driver Installation Sequence
« Reply #7 on: 05-November-18, 21:51:46 »

sorry to dig up this old topic,

but what about USB drivers? I have ASMedia USB drivers on my GE62VR 6RF laptop. Where do they fit in? In between IRST (Intel Rapid Storage Technology) and Intel Graphics (iGPU - integrated Intel GPU)?
I might, scratch that, will need USB access for an external drive with the installation files.

Hi JasperW,

Sorry, I don't have an answer about the MSI ASMedia driver. All I can report is the installation sequence that MSI provided for my GT80 2QE and suggest that it will be similar for most MSI gaming notebooks that use similar MSI drivers. Since my notebook is over 3 years old now, features that were introduced later (like USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt) are not included in MSI's installation sequence. Mysteriously, MSI no longer appears to provide driver installation sequences on its website. I don't understand why they removed the information. It's as if they don't want to help users. Or maybe they only want users to do a factory restore because they dislike it when we do a clean Windows install. Regardless of the reason, I'm not impressed with MSI Support.

My advice is to install the MSI ASMedia driver last, after you've installed the other MSI drivers. If that doesn't work and you can offer better advice, please post what you've learned here for the benefit of other users.
 
 
Windows USB Drivers
It might be helpful for newcomers to review the USB drivers provided by MSI for its gaming notebooks. If anyone has more information, please provide it. Thanks...

USB 2.0 -- MSI provides no driver because it uses the native Microsoft Windows driver.

USB 3.0 -- For Win 8.1 and Win 10, MSI provides no driver because it uses the native Microsoft Windows USB driver. However, if MSI supports Win 7 on your model, they provide an MSI USB 3.0 driver for Win 7 since Win 7 never shipped with a native USB 3.0 driver.

USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt -- This can get very complicated because MSI uses the USB-C connector for both USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt (TB) and, if TB is supported, it is simultaneous over the same USB-C connector. As far as I'm aware, the USB-C port of all MSI gaming notebook models has USB 3.1 support. The complicating part is that MSI's TB support is inconsistent. Some gaming notebook models get none---their USB-C connector functions only as a USB 3.1 port. Some models add limited TB support (like data only and only at slow TB1 or TB2 speeds). And a few of MSI's recent top-of-the-line GT models have received better TB support with DP (DisplayPort) video and higher data bandwidths like TB3. But beware: the video over TB support may be limited to only one display (full TB3 should offer video over multiple displays---but MSI seems very slow to provide this capability---and if you use TB for video, you may sacrifice video out your notebook's dedicated DP port).

My GT80 2QE only has USB 3.0 so I've never seen any of the USB 3.1 or TB drivers. But MSI lists an "Intel Thunderbolt driver" for its current flagship, the GT83VR 7RF. There is no ASMedia driver for this model---at least not by name. If MSI provides some models like the GE62VR 6RF with an ASMedia driver for its USB 3.1 and/or TB port, then it seems to show that MSI's driver support may be just as varied as it's TB feature support.

It's my understanding that MSI had switched to Win 10 by the time it offered USB 3.1 and TB so we can probably assume that there may not be any Win 8.1 support from MSI for these features and certainly no Win 7 support. And it's also my understanding that USB 3.1 and TB drivers (whether from Intel or ASMedia) must be configured by MSI for each individual notebook model. So only use the USB 3.1 or TB driver that MSI provides for your model notebook. Do not allow Win 10 Update to replace them with newer generic versions.

Kind regards, David
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GT80 2QE Titan SLI-001 • i7-4720HQ • 32 GB DRAM • 2 x GTX 980M in SLI • 16 GB VRAM (8 GB/GPU) • 2 x 512 GB Micron M600 M.2 SSDs in mirrored Recovery array • 2 x 128 Toshiba M.2 SSDs in mirrored RAID-1 • 2 TB Samsung 850 EVO SSD • MiniPro RAID V2 external case w/ 2 x 2 TB Seagate ST2000LM003 HD in RAID-1 for local backup • 40" Philips 4K UHD BDM4065UC monitor • Logitech G910 Orion Spectrum RGB external keyboard • Logitech G903 Lightspeed wireless mouse w/ Powerplay charging mousepad • Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit • Adobe Master Collection CS6
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