Close

Register Now!

To Get More Info and Daily Reward.

Please login or register.
Advanced search    

News:

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: M.2 port configuration GP73-609  (Read 233 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

rgaglerTopic starter

  • Nanoguy
  • PRIVATE E-2
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3
M.2 port configuration GP73-609
« on: 10-February-19, 17:38:41 »

Does anyone know how many m.2 pcie nvme ports are on the GP73-609?
Alternatively, is there a comprehensive list of m.2 pcie nvme port configurations for MSI laptops?
Logged

RaiderGamer

  • LIEUTENANT COLONEL
  • *
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 1507
Re: M.2 port configuration GP73-609
« Reply #1 on: 10-February-19, 19:39:40 »

is this your laptop?



================additional info========================

M.2 slot -- There are two kinds of M.2 SSD. One kind has a PCIe NVMe interface and the other has a SATA interface. Your M.2 SSD "combo" slot is compatible with both kinds so you have the choice of which type to use. However, M.2 PCIe NVMe SSDs run hot, can overheat in many notebooks (which cause them to automatically throttle down their speed) and they require BIOS support on a model-by-model basis if you want to use them as a boot device (where Windows is installed). If you install an M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD that does not have BIOS support, you can still use it as a data drive---but you won't be able to boot from it (you'll have to install Windows on your other storage device). And, to make matters worse, MSI does not tell users which M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD models are supported by its BIOS---they want you to ship your notebook to an authorized MSI Service Center and pay them to install an SSD upgrade. M.2 SATA SSDs are a better choice for most notebooks because they don't get as hot and they are universally supported as boot devices. But M.2 SATA SSDs are not as fast as the PCIe NVMe models---but they're still way faster than a HD.

NVMe protocol...
The NVMe protocol serves to speed or accelerate communication over a PCIe bus---it is not essential. A PCIe bus will work fine without NVMe (albeit a little slower) and some M.2 PCIe SSDs did not use NVMe (though they are rare now). In theory, NVMe can probably be used over other communication buses but I'm not aware of any.



M.2 edge connectors...
For a PCIe SSD, the B key usually denotes a slower x2 (two lane) PCIe interface and the M key usually denotes a faster x4 (four lane) PCIe interface. However, for a SATA SSD, the keys don't mean anything. Some manufactures provide only a B key for an M.2 SATA SSD and some manufacturers provide only an M key. For a SATA SSD, the only consideration is that the notch match the key of the M.2 slot. To prevent physical compatibility mismatches (and since the keys have no meaning for SATA SSDs) most M.2 SATA SSDs now come notched for both B and M keys (called B+M) so they are "universal" and will work with any M.2 SSD slot that supports SATA. So the only thing you can tell from the edge connector is that, if it is notched for both keys, it must be SATA. However, if it is notched for only one key, it could be SATA or PCIe.

2280 size...
One more specification: The length of the M.2 SSD circuit board. So far, all MSI gaming notebooks require a 2280 size (22 x 80 mm). All M.2 SSDs have a 22 mm width---it's the length that can vary and cause trouble because the mounting screw that secures the SSD in place changes location, depending on the length of the M.2 SSD. So you must use an 80 mm long M.2 SSD for MSI gaming notebooks and, fortunately, this is the most common size. The shorter M.2 SSDs (2242 and 2260) will still plug into an MSI gaming notebook and work, but you won't be able to secure them with the mounting screw and this can allow them to vibrate loose. Obviously, the SSD doesn't vibrate, but the fans and other devices inside the notebook do and can cause the SSD to work loose. An unsecured M.2 SSD can also work loose when you transport your notebook. This is a common occurrence if the SSD is not secured.

To further complicate the mounting, if an M.2 SSD was not installed at the MSI factory, the mounting screw may not be provided and users will need to purchase their own (since they are not provided with the M.2 SSD, either). It's a fairly short metric screw with M.2 threads. That should be easy to remember since the interface is "M2".

above information was taken from davids posts on this thread:
https://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?topic=315038.0
Logged

rgaglerTopic starter

  • Nanoguy
  • PRIVATE E-2
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3
Re: M.2 port configuration GP73-609
« Reply #2 on: 10-February-19, 21:18:53 »

The laptop I am asking about is model GP73 Leopard-609

https://us.msi.com/Laptop/GP73-Leopard-Intel-8th-Gen/Specification
Logged

rgagler

  • PRIVATE E-2
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Re: M.2 port configuration GP73-609
« Reply #3 on: 11-February-19, 12:48:48 »

The laptop I am asking about is not the Leopard GP73 8RE. It the the leopard GP73-609.
Does the GP73-609 have two NVME PCIE ports which are both capable to support SSD drives?
Logged

pennknig

  • LIEUTENANT COLONEL
  • *
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 2363
Re: M.2 port configuration GP73-609
« Reply #4 on: 11-February-19, 17:04:42 »

The laptop I am asking about is not the Leopard GP73 8RE. It the the leopard GP73-609.
Does the GP73-609 have two NVME PCIE ports which are both capable to support SSD drives?
Open it up, take a look, how hard can that be?
At minimum, SATA, at best NVMe.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up