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Author Topic: Advice on Overclocking Ryzen 3900x with MSI X570 Gaming Edge Wifi  (Read 1169 times)

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bbertrand.cfwiTopic starter

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Hello, MSI!

I'm wondering if there are any forum readers who have had successful trials at overclocking their new Ryzen 3900x. I'm really new to OCing and I think I failed the first time through. All I did at the start was set the CPU Frequency to 4400 and it caused a boot failure. I had to reset the MOBO to get out the of the Black Screen of Death.

So I'm reaching out to see if anyone has any good settings, specifically for the MSI BIOS. I'm really unfamiliar with it.

If this helps:
Mobo: MSI X570 Gaming Edge Wifi
Cooler: NZXT Kraken x62
CPU: Ryzen 9  3900x
GPU: Zotac RTX 2070 Super
RAM: Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3600 32GB (4x8)

Thank you for any tips and tricks!
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buddyw53

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Hello, MSI!
...
So I'm reaching out to see if anyone has any good settings, specifically for the MSI BIOS. I'm really unfamiliar with it.
...
Thank you for any tips and tricks!
Just so you know, you're not talking to MSI.  This an independent board run by people who have only an informal relationship to MSI.

Firstly: Zen2 has very little overclocking headroom.  You also may have very unrealistic expectations in that you won't be able to get an overclock to any Zen2 processor's maximum boost frequencies on all cores.

Your best settings are probably to leave voltage at Auto, open the Advance CPU menu and enable PBO using Advanced settings.  Set all the parameters to the highest you can get (type in 1000 for each but some may be self limiting).  Then set the PBO Scalar to 10X.  These let the processor boost without VRM power or current limitations so it will stay boosted longer and at higher frequencies.  This works better with better cooling since the boost algorithm still looks at thermal headroom to determine when to pull back under load.

Playing with manual overclocks requires a lot of extra voltage and it will generate a lot of heat...good thing you have a 240mm AIO.  CPU core voltage is a bit confusing, but try to keep loaded voltage below 1.35 V. And look at SVI2 VCore, using HWInfo64.  

When you get a stable all-core overclock you'll be disappointed in single thread scores as they'll be lower than letting the CPU manage itself.  AMD has squeezed everything out of these CPU's with a very aggressive boosting algorithm.  So manual OC'g is only going to help with getting all-core improvements when you have really good cooling.  That can help with long productivity tasks (rendering, encoding, scientific simulations) but not with games that present much lighter threaded loads.

For games, and other lightly threaded workloads, a 3900X has other very interesting overclocking features.  Since it has two CCD's...Core Complex Dies, or chiplets...it can do what's called 'per core (or CCD)' overclocking.  In RyzenMaster, you can set only select cores to operate at higher frequencies for games to take advantage from, keeping other cores slower. The new Windows scheduler loads up the cores that are fastest.  You can only do this in Ryzenmaster right now, and it's an advanced OC method I'm not familiar with since I don't have a 3900x.  Sounds intriguing, although I'm not sure how effective it is in practice.
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roba845

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ive recently purchased a 3600 and have been researching this myself, ive been following linus tech tips on youtube for some time and anthony has just posted his take on overclocking ryzen 3000 series.
heres the link 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w1EGPZUESU

ive not dared try it myself just yet, but might with this video.
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