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Author Topic: TV out resolution  (Read 14144 times)

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Dst

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TV out resolution
« on: 05-October-04, 22:52:34 »

I finally connected my MSI MEGA 180 to my TV, but got some
problems.

If i use 800x600 on my 36"" Sony widescreen i get 3 cm black bars on top/bottom.
What resolution should i use ?

I tried adding a custom resolution of 720x576, then it shrinked to 1 cm top/bottom.

800x800 seems to be too high, it makes the screen scroll, it doesn get right if i try values between 600 and 800, it suddenly gets too big.

Whats the recomended screen resolution on tv out for a widescreen tv ??
Or how do i stretch it so it covers the entire screen ?

I'm not impressed with the quality, it's very blurry, hard to see text etc...

Dst
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Normunds

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« Reply #1 on: 05-October-04, 23:19:47 »

I can't advise unfortunately whioch is the right resolution for a widescreen tv (aspect ratio 16:9), however one thing seems to be for sure - in the "normal"video signal there are just 625 lines (vertical pixels that is), out of even this modest number a good deal of them is "wasted" for various purposes, e.g. frame sync pulses, teletext, etc. If I recall right, the actual resolution of a standard TV is something like 500 lines.

so it seems to me that wacthing a PC on a TV is not meant to be from a close distance, or for reading some small print..
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jjarrett

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« Reply #2 on: 06-October-04, 05:22:46 »

Couple of questions first:

1) How are you connecting to your tv (Coax, DVI, other)
2) What are you doing when you have the problem? (Viewing DVDs, computer, other?)
3) Is your TV an SDTV, EDTV, or HDTV?
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Dst

  • Guest
« Reply #3 on: 06-October-04, 06:09:07 »

I'm connecting through a svideo -> scart cable.

Viewing DVDs seems to be ok,  a bit blurry, not razer sharp.
But viewing my desktop is almost impossible, small fonts on shortcuts etc.

I live in norway, i dont think i have heard about those types, it's
a normal analog tv ? lol
Tube tv, 100hz, trinitron, dont rememeber the model number.
Total weight is 100kg (my back knows all about that:).

Dst
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otrofox

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« Reply #4 on: 06-October-04, 10:42:09 »
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  • I can hardly see my desktop fonts but... I CAN!!
    Maybe your svideo cable is not good enough or too long. Try another cable. the quality, of course, has nothing to do with the one of a monitor but... it's enough for me. I use the zoom function of my wireless mouse to read small fonts, such as emule, explorer, desktop, etc. Gaming and watching videos/DVD, the quality is good  :biggthumbsup:
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    jjarrett

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    « Reply #5 on: 06-October-04, 15:46:16 »

    Alright, if it's a normal TV then it is SDTV (Standard Definition Television).  

    From this URL
    Each frame of video contains about 480 active lines of information (482.5 actually, but we will talk round numbers here to communicate the concept). Now a single frame of video is actually painted on the screen line-by-line in two passes. On the first pass, the beam paints all of the odd numbered lines from 1 to 479, top to bottom. That takes 1/60 second. On the second pass it paints all of the even numbered lines from 2 to 480. That also takes 1/60 second. So it takes a total of 1/30 second to display all 480 lines of the frame. This display technique is known as "interlacing."

    When they broadcast video information, they need to give CRT-type TVs time to reset the electronic beam to the top of the screen so it can get ready to paint the next sequence of lines. So they build in an interframe gap that equals about 45 lines. There is no picture information in this 45 line gap—it is there just to allow the TV time to get ready to receive the next frame. So the total number of lines in each frame is 480 + 45 = 525. You've probably heard that a TV set has 525 lines. Not so. The signal has 525 lines, but only 480 of them contain active video information that ends up on your screen.


    I am willing to bet that you are running your desktop in something other than 640 x 480 resolution (which I believe XP supports 800x600 by default).   Try the 640 x 480 setting and let us know if that fixes the problem.
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    otrofox

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    « Reply #6 on: 06-October-04, 15:58:57 »
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  • I'm not sure but I think that these 480 lines are vertical lines, aren't they? At least, watching TV sooo much close, I can see vertical lines. So the max resolution in TV should be 480 x something.

    By the way, the MPEG2 standard SVCD resolution is 480 (horizontal) x 576 (vertical)

    Can anyone explain that better?
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    MSI Mega 180 Deluxe
    Seagate 160GB
    Athlon 2800+ Barton
    1x DIMM DDR 400  512MB
    Toshiba DVD-ROM
    Radeon X1600 512MB
    SkyStar 2 DVB Satellite
    MS Windows XP Pro SP2
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